Blog

Out of Africa - African Cushions

Evolution, African Themed Cushions

A fantastic way to inject some sophistication into any room is by the introduction of these beautiful African themed scatter cushions by South African textile designers Evolution Product.  Whether you want to be subtle or bold, the designs on these cushions will compliment any colour scheme. Our designer has a tale to tell, and this is reflected in their striking fabric designs.

African scatter cushions from evolution

Aptly named Evolution Product have drawn their inspiration from historic explorers and have designed a series of cloths and cushions which form the collection. These 17th Century explorers enjoyed a passion for knowledge and a desire to explore unchartered spaces. It was their fervent desire to learn more which led them away from the shores of the Cape and into the hinterlands of Southern Africa. Their aim was to meticulously record the plants, trees and animals they encountered on their perilous journeys into the veld. Many of them were devoted to sketching in scientific detail the things they discovered.
Evolution african scatter cushions
The exquisite images of the Evolution fabric range were originally drawn by Dutch explorer, soldier, artist, naturalist and linguist Robert Jacob Gordon, German painter Hendrik Claudius and English explorer, naturalist and painter George French Angas. Gordonʼs designs (Yellow Fish and Snake) show his interest in South African plants and animals, whereas Claudius, who was noted for his 17th-century watercolours of South African plants and animals, work beautifully with the linen fabric (Caterpillar, Euphorbia and Melon Ribbed Euphorbia). Lastly the stunning Natal design brings to life Angasʼ original ʻUmnonoti River in Natalʼ which was a published watercolour in 1849.
Please visit more cushions on our online store or venture in to the studio to really explore these amazing cushions.

#PorcupineRocksMyHouse

Evolution scatter cushions rock my house
Shop Now?
      

← Older Post | Newer Post →